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Bad Loving (Single)

John Lindberg Trio

Booze Music / Enviken

A band that is deserving of wider acceptance on a global scale is Swedish rockers John Lindberg Trio (JLT). Despite a lack of widespread acknowledgement of their work, it is pleasing to see and hear in the instance of current single ‘Bad Loving’ that the trio has lost none of their appetite for creating original rockin’ tunes. Continuing the good fight for rock ‘n’ roll music in 2022, and setting a precedent of things to come, is the aforementioned ‘Bad Loving’, which also includes additional song writing by fellow Swede and songwriter Teddie Ericsson. The single itself is best described as a “bopper” for modern times with its tight sharp rhythm that is instantaneous in its liking and initially provides a smokescreen for the lyrics, which are the polar opposite to the loveable feel of this rockin’ tune. In fact, ‘Bad Loving’ is almost a trip down memory lane as it is close to 80’s chart action from the likes of The Jets and Shakin’ Stevens, and that’s no bad thing. Therefore, if sadness sounds this good, then heap more misery on the recording pile of JLT because any desires of reaching a broader audience could be around the next corner if they can maintain the “radio quality goodness” of new single ‘Bad Loving’.


Released 17 June

 

R&B Goes R&R 3: Dance Girl Dance

Various Artists

Atomicat

Taking a jaunt for the third time is the album series ‘R&B Goes R&R’. With its by now customary twenty-eight tracks of its playlist completing Volume 3, DeeJay Mark Armstrong is once more responsible for sourcing the material. The songs unearthed contains much familiarity but there’s also unfamiliar choices and one or two unusual additions, which is often the strength of this album series. One item which has not been mentioned yet is the quality of the artwork, which is an impressive sight and makes for an attractive addition to the quality of the music set. Moving through the years from 1955 to 1963, ‘R&B Goes R&R 3: Dance Girl Dance’ offers cover versions of rhythm and blues’ rockers performed by American and Australian artists who aimed to emulate the original performers but, in doing so, also provided further exposure of the “original” rock ‘n’ roll sound. The decision to start with Eddie Dugosh and song ‘Strange Kinda Feeling’ is prime example of the quality of the music chosen, but also for not opting for the most obvious considering there’s Gene Vincent (‘Jump Back, Honey, Jump Back’), Jerry Lee Lewis (‘Save The Last Dance For Me’) and The Everly Brothers (‘Hey Doll Baby’) all present yet not in pole position. The vintage rockabilly of ‘Strange Kinda Feeling’ is as impressive as anything the bigger “names” conjure up here and, if anything, Volume 3 certainly provides room for the lesser known/less featured artists to perform. Step forward Lawrence Shaul and primitive yet engaging rendition of ‘Tutti Frutti’, Frances Faye ‘It’s You I Love’, which is certainly more sophisticated and is music set for films of its era as well. Paul Peek maintains the less featured rhythm via his version of Ray Charles classic ‘The Rock-A-Round’ and it’s an absolute belter! Add to an ongoing list Ernie Sigley (‘The Big Beat’), Cody Brennan (‘Ruby Baby’), and Bunny Paul once again (See Volume 2) and track ‘Honey Love’, and ‘R&B Goes R&R 3: Dance Girl Dance’ is equal to its previous albums, but also adds a considerable bit more with a longer line of obscurer cover songs. Top quality from start to finish and worth far more in monetary value than its given price tag, ‘R&B Goes R&R 3: Dance Girl’ is essential!


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R&B Goes R&R 2: Rock & Roll Music

Various Artists

Atomicat

Second album in the new series from Atomicat is – ‘R&B Goes R&R 2: Rock & Roll Music’. As with its predecessor, album number two turns rhythm and blues songs into rock ‘n’ roll songs and featuring several musicians from the States and Australia. The combined efforts once more make for a fascinating listen and just as Volume 1 impressed, Volume 2 proves equally compelling. Supporting this claim is the twenty-eight-track list featuring artists from Buddy Holly and Wanda Jackson to Hayden Thompson, Rusty York, Charlie Gore, Ella Mae Morse, and Marty Robbins. Again, as with the first album, there are plenty of names that feature with their versions of rhythm and blues tracks that are scarce to find on similar types of compilations. Despite being a name, Bunny Paul’s rendition of ‘Such A Night’ is one such example that doesn’t pop up when scouring the back catalogues of collected works of similar albums. Ditto Johnny Chester and more associated with Elvis ‘Milk Cow Blues’, not to mention names as The Toppers and song ‘Mr. Lee’, and The Goofers ‘Hearts Of Stone’. Beginning with such examples is a great way to approach this album when listening because there are more familiar artists as Buddy Holly, Wanda Jackson, and Warren Smith who will be known to many, but despite the familiarity, the tracks chosen are excellent additions given the rawness of Holly’s ‘Ting-A-Ling’, engaging vocals of Jackson’s during ‘Slippin’ And Slidin’, and Hayden Thompson’s rockabilly ‘Love My Baby’. Add to that group Ronnie Hawkins compelling reading of Bo Diddley’s ‘Who Do You Love’ complete with captivating guitar, and Volume Two of ‘R&B Goes R&R’ lives up to its additional heading “Rock & Roll Music” by providing plenty of fine examples of this.


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R&B Goes R&R 1: My Baby Left Me

Various Artists

Atomicat

New arrival ‘R&B Goes R&R 1 My Baby Left Me’ via Atomicat sees twenty-eight tracks of rhythm and blues given the cover version treatment! Featuring artists from both America and Australia, the songs chosen are either directly represented or reinterpreted for your listening pleasure. It makes for an interesting combination where a big band interpretation begins proceedings via Loren Becker and truly upbeat rendition of ‘My Baby Left Me’, before knocking on the neighbouring door and enquiring if Johnny Rebb would like to come out and play, with the answer being a resounding “Yes!” and then proceeding to apply a touch of grease to Chuck Berry’s ‘Maybellene’. Rock ‘n’ roll (albeit a rather clean application) applies to Boyd Bennett and his version of ‘Mumbles Blues’. Bennett’s version makes for a tight, snappy rhythm and it lingers in the mind for some time after. From there the music continues to intrigue with a stunning interpretation of ‘Roll Over Beethoven’ from Helene Dixon who compels via a throaty vocal and the guitar almost too hot to handle! The company surrounding this track is equally impressive with heavyweight names adding their worth from Jerry Lee Lewis and ‘Hit The Road Jack’, Elvis Presley and great choice with Ray Charles’ ‘I Got A Woman’, Ronnie Hawkins adding ‘My Girl Is Red Hot’, and not Jerry Lee this time but Paul Wyatt offering an impressive take on ‘Whole Lotta Shakin’. With talk of a five-album collection featuring rhythm and blues tracks being given the rock ‘n’ roll treatment, Volume 1 “My Baby Left Me” in this new series certainly gets off to a flyer especially when there’s terrific rockabilly via Lou Millet (‘Shorty The Barber’), a classic from The Johnny Burnette Trio (‘Train Kept A Rollin’), and Vince Everett (Baby Let’s Play House’) and plenty of interesting versions of rock ‘n’ roll featuring David Houston (‘Sugar Sweet’) and Pete Peters (‘Fanny Brown’) for example.


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120 Years Of The Cadillac Car

Various Artists

Atomicat

An album to celebrate that great invention known as the automobile but an LP with one American classic in mind and that being the Cadillac. To honour this historic motor, Atomicat Records has created a full album dedicated to the Cadillac car. Given the title ‘120 Years Of The Cadillac Car’, DeeJay Mark Armstrong handpicks thirty songs to represent the classic Cadillac with a mixture of rhythm and blues, rockers and hillbillies, and songs named directly after the car or lyrics referencing it. Beginning with a series of rhythm and blues tracks and featuring Jimmy Liggins with ‘Cadillac Boogie’, Roy Brown and ‘Cadillac Baby’ to, in demand right now, Bo Diddley with ‘Cadillac’, and Willie Brown ‘Cadillac Boogie’. The album continues its interesting and lively analysis of the Cadillac with superb rockabilly from Hal Willis and ‘My Pink Cadillac’ (They really don’t make them like they used to!), Sonny Wallace and alternative colour ‘Black Cadillac’ that really is a terrific raw and rickety rockabilly track, before adding equally compelling Joyce Green with same song title yet different song’ Black Cadillac’. The “hillbillies” featuring equally good turns by Don Churchill ‘Cadillac Blues’ and western swing Bob Wills chipping in with ‘Cadillac In Model A’, and the listener already has an album’s worth of top-quality tunes. But that’s not all folks because the musical goodness continues with the previously mentioned recognition of the classic Cadillac in song title or lyrics with pick from a very fine crop including Wanda Jackson and snappy rhythm ‘Baby Loves Him’, Young Jessie ‘Mary Lou’, The Cadillacs ‘Speedo’, and El Dorados with ‘Rock ‘n’ Roll Is For Me’. An excellent collection of songs, not to mention ideas knitted together to form a complete whole that makes more than perfect sense in celebration of the American Cadillac and can be heard via ‘120 Years Of The Cadillac Car’.


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Dance Craze-A-Rama Volume 1

Various Artists

Atomicat

There is a profound sense of FUN, and much to be had, when listening to the latest addition from Atomicat. With a similar album series also featuring songs associated with the dance style of “The Twist”, this time around the newest album is less specific yet broader in terms of its approach by offering a sense of the “carefree” and dance to your own rhythm. What this means is an album packed full of songs featuring a particular “dance” in mind or the mood of the song is full of celebration leaving you to decide whether you want to dance alone or with a partner. Leading the charge here is Dion with The Isley Brothers’ ‘Shout’, containing a charismatic punch from its opening discussion before launching headfirst into this number. Great start, and more to come via the tight rhythmic ‘The Wobble’ supplied by Jimmy McCracklin, to immediate appeal of rhythm and blues/rock ‘n’ roll of ‘Diddle Dee Dee’ from Bobby Dunn. Noticeably different about this companion piece to Volume 1 in the “Twist” series is that there are far more obscurer titles and artists that will be known to serious collectors, but to a lesser extent casual listeners. But it is also the eccentricity of some of the tracks with excellent and engaging piece from The Champs and ‘The Shoddy Shoddy’ with lyrics that deserve your attention, to unique titles as ‘The Whiz Wash’ (Baby Wayne), ‘The Kangaroo’ (Clifford Scott), ‘Pony Time’ (Don Covay), and The Mandels with ‘The Scotch’. Overall, a more unique take on the dance craze and expertly lived up to by the tracks chosen for this compilation because not only is it a suitable companion for the dancefloor, but it also makes for an entertaining listen in the comfort of your own home.


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Twist-A-Rama Volume 1

Various Artists

Atomicat

Ushering in a new album series is Atomicat with ‘Twist-A-Rama’. The first volume focuses specifically on, you guessed it, “The Twist” which was the dance of the 1960s. Therefore, in line with the fashionable dance of the time, and naturally still popular throughout dance halls today, ‘Twist-A-Rama Volume 1’ features various artists from the periods 1959 through to 1963 with songs often upbeat in style and plenty of “twists” in their titles! So, expect to hear songs relaying the glories of this popular dance, to memories of this time in history combined with themes of love and romance. It’s a glorious album from start to finish and one that is packed with much energy and enthusiasm. It’s the kind of album that immediately puts a smile on your face with opening song ‘Kissin’ Twist’ by Jack Hammer proving this with its infectious rhythm and charismatic vocals. From there, the mood continues to be infectious with tracks by Herbert Hunter and ‘Twist It Up’, to an instrumental from The Champs (‘Tequila Twist’), and teen-pop by Jo Ann Campbell and ‘Let Me Do My Twist’. Packed with lively numbers by the likes of Hank Ballard and The Midnighters and specifically for the dance in question ‘The Twist’, which made a name for Chubby Checker who, on this occasion, pops up with ‘My Baby Cares For Me’ and shares vocals with Bobby Rydell. Once again, Atomicat does its research and plunges for the less obvious choices when selecting its track list and opts for interesting turns from Chuck Berry and ‘I’m Talking About You’, Kay Armen ‘I Wanna Twist’, Brice Coefield ‘Cha Cha Twist’, and U.S. Bonds (Interesting moniker!) ‘New Orleans’. If you want to move to songs predominately featuring “The Twist”, then you have come to the right place because ‘Twist-A-Rama Volume 1’ is an irresistible force that will have you dancing the night away at your local dance hall.


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Rockin’ Rollin’ Covers Vol. 3

Various Artists

Atomicat

Given the quality of what has gone before in terms of album releases by Atomicat, you immediately get the feeling that you are in safe hands with each album release. The same feeling applies to latest compilation ‘Rockin’ Rollin’ Covers Vol. 3’, a series that sees a variety of artists from the 50s and early portion of the 60s attempting their hands at songs made famous by other, and often well-established artists of these same time periods. The results are often inspiring and more times than not worthwhile executions of songs made popular first time. As with many of Atomicat releases, the musicians featured are household names, but there are always plenty of interesting twists with equally as many lesser-known artists represented. Two names and tracks that immediately jump out from the playlist are Carl Perkins “piano” version of classic ‘Whole Lotta Shakin’ Goin’ On’, to another classic ‘Mystery Train’ originally by Little Junior Parker and then Elvis Presley jumping on board, before Vernon Taylor offering his version which, it must be said, is another terrific take on this excellent song.  By investing your hard-earned cash in this album, any listener will certainly receive their money’s worth because it is filled with quality tracks from LaVern Baker and superbly rockin’ ‘Hurtin’ Inside’, to Ted Daigle turning up the heat just like Eddie (Cochran) during ‘Cut Across Shorty’. There are beautiful vocal harmonies to be found via Donnie And The Dreamers’ ‘My Memories Of You’, wild antics especially in the guitars of ‘She, She, Little Sheila’ by The Darnells, and really rather different version and especially for the times in terms of its vocal delivery from Billy Ward And His Dominoes and song ‘Jennie Lee’. With a total of thirty tracks selected for your listening pleasure, and too much to cover in one review alone, let’s say that with the addition of Ernest Tubb And His Texas Troubadours, Jerry Demar (Listen out for those guitars folks!), Dee Dee Sharp, and Charlie Gore to name but a handful, it is clear that ‘Rockin’ Rollin’ Covers Vol. 3’ is a summary of cover versions from 1952 – 1963 yet contains more than enough details to keep any listener engaged. Absolute rockin’ greatness!


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Atomicat Rockers Issue 05 – Dungaree Cutie

Various Artists

Atomicat

After previous volume ‘Do You Wanna Dance’ manoeuvred itself into pole position, Issue 05 of ‘Atomicat Rockers – Dungaree Cutie’ has a lot to live up to. Once more housed in environmentally friendly packaging, the next album in this series offers another twenty-eight tracks of rock ‘n’ roll, rhythm and blues, doo wop and songs closer to teenage pop. It all makes for a highly attractive package and one that seriously rocks from its starting point. First in line is The Deep River Boys with ‘Oh! Well A Watcha Gonna Do’ and we’re in classic 50s territory with a movie backdrop where the vocals are golden and the dancehall floor is packed! A great start that continues from the well-known Fats Domino and track ‘You Done Me Wrong’, to a less featured musician by the name of Sugar Boy and celebratory ‘No More Heartache’, which is a perky wax of rhythm and blues. The unfamiliar continues once the Rotators ‘Double Exposure Part 1 – Five Foot Two Eyes of Blue’ teenage pop arrives on the car radio and as soon as it finishes, it leaves you wondering when “Part 2” will get underway. Such tracks provide reminders that there is always a song or two that will be fresh to many listeners’ ears and therefore remains one of the attractions of the Atomic Rockers’ albums. Bearing this in mind, another compelling piece of rhythm and blues performed by Aggie Dukes with ‘John John’ is another reason to support these releases because Atomicat is clearly doing its research. Speaking of different, there’s fun to be had via Nervous Norvus’ ‘Ape Call’, not forgetting to mention an impressive attempt at Elvis Presley with ‘Devil In Disguise’ from Wayne Harris. Glancing in the rear-view mirror to see if there are any late contenders and Sonny James’ ‘Apache’ with added lyrics considering it is best known as an instrumental is hot on the heels, to another teenage rocker with Jackie Walker laying down the guidelines with ‘Only Teenagers Allowed’. Not ending there because the likes of Johnny Burnette, Conway Twitty, Wanda Jackson, and wonderful rockabilly from Roy Moss (‘You Nearly Lose Your Mind’) all make appearances, leaving Issue 05 ‘Atomicat Rockers – Dungaree Cutie’ neck and neck with its nearest and previous competitor. The album series ‘Atomicat Rockers’ can’t do no wrong!

 

 


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Atomicat Rockers Issue 04 – Do You Wanna Dance

Various Artists

Atomicat

Maintaining a connection with all things associated with rock ‘n’ roll, Atomicat issues its next in the series of albums, ‘Atomicat Rockers’. Arriving thick and fast in terms of their release dates, album #4 is already upon those with a keen interest in this series. The tunes featured so far have been of an exhilarating nature, and with plenty of the less obvious tracks thrown in, which is all down to Dee Jay Mark Armstrong who is responsible for the ‘Atomicat Rockers’ album series. Housed inside eco-friendly packaging, Mark Armstrong loads another twenty-eight tracks and brings to life ‘Atomicat Rockers Issue 04 – ‘Do You Wanna Dance’. Setting off on a trail beginning with Dick Lory and rockabilly/early stages of rock ‘n’ roll ‘Ballroom Baby’. From there, the artists and tracks selected continue the same level of quality with the other half of the Burnette brothers, Dorsey Burnette, offering the gospel tinged ‘Don’t Let Go’, to classic rhythm and blues via Eugene Church and ‘I Ain’t Goin’ For That’. Mixed with vocal groups as The Mints who provide a freshness and sense of enjoyment when belting out ‘Night Air’, to another vocal group, The Jewels, and track ‘The Goin’ Goin’ Goin’, which is terrific from start to finish and very different to anything else you’ll hear during this compilation given its anxious mood, realised through a barrage of words of a relationship gone south emphasised further by its repetitive beat. Therefore, only one thing to do and that’s, “Buy, buy, buy” Atomicat Rockers Issue 04 – ‘Do You Wanna Dance’ because (for our money) it’s the best of the series so far, especially when Jerry Lee Lewis, Gene Vincent, Buddy Holly, Hank Ballard and The Midnighters, and Brit, Billy Fury are brought to the party.


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Kiss Me – Rock ‘N’ Roll Songs Of Happiness Vol.2

Various Artists

Atomicat

The gap between releases for the ‘Kiss Me’ series from its first volume until now has been considerable, but finally the time has arrived for the second volume in what proved something of a hit with many supporters during the first album release. To provide its full title, ‘Kiss Me – Rock ‘N’ Roll Songs Of Happiness Volume 2’, compiler Mark Armstrong has worked hard with his research and unearthed numerous rock ‘n’ roll, and rhythm and blues gems good enough for the dancehalls of the 50s and 60s, as well as associated clubs today. With the tracks chosen dating from 1955 and ending in 1961, there’s a good deal of variety and with, you guessed it, plenty of songs featuring the subject of love and, in this instance, all the joy and happiness this can bring. Firing up the album’s playlist is Pat Kelly and track ‘Hey Doll Baby’ making for a lively start with vocal yelps and a rhythm that is part rock ‘n’ roll and the other half leaning on teen pop. From such an impressive beginning, more of the same quality follows and can be deduced from similar sounds featuring Chuck Johnson and ‘Sweet Baby’, Delores Fredericks with ‘Jack Pot’, to feeling high on life as generated by Andy Caldwell during the song ‘She’s So Fine’. Adding more quality tracks to this pile arrives via an excellent turn from Johnny Burnett (aka Burnette), who is bestowed the honour of the title track, ‘Kiss Me’, which also reveals his initial foray into pop music. The Trojans’ rhythm and blues lives up to its name because their chosen track, ‘I Wanna Make Love To You’, is built of sturdy stuff. Lloyd Price is Mr. Charisma personified during ‘Hello Little Girl’ with a vocal performance that commands attention, and one supplemented by brass instrumentation and therefore putting the “exotica” in the rhythm and blues. Not ending there because the rhythms become even more frantic as feelings of love take hold demonstrated by The Four Tops and lively ‘Kiss Me Baby’, to Clarence “Frogman” Henry portraying several different personalities in sheer excitement during ‘I’m In Love’. Volume 2 ‘Kiss Me’ is an absolute peach of an album, and one that lives up to its billing of “Rock ‘N’ Roll Songs Of Happiness” because these songs will leave you feeling very satisfied.

 


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The Diddley Daddy Sound

Various Artists

Atomicat

An appreciation of artist Bo Diddley comes in the form of new album ‘The Diddley Daddy Sound’. Released by Atomicat and housed in a three-fold digipak complete with liner notes, the tracks selected by Dee Jay Mark Armstrong are from numerous musicians influenced by Bo Diddley. Known for his clave rhythm and 5/4 rhythm pattern with plenty of tremolo guitar, Bo Diddley made a serious name for himself and influenced many during the 50s and 60s. Such examples are detailed here with the album ‘The Diddley Daddy Sound’ presenting twenty-eight tracks covering the years beginning 1955 and leading up to 1963. As with similar collections from Atomicat highlighting various music legends, the compiled tracks feature many artists influenced by the “Diddley” sound rather than presenting a full-length album by the specific artist in focus. Therefore, expect to see a few familiar faces along with a few lesser-known musicians. Beginning with female artist Cora Woods and song ‘Rocks In Your Head’, the sound of Bo Diddley is recognisable as the repetitive beat becomes hypnotic and instantly likeable from its short tight rhythmic sections, harmonious backing vocals, and a lead vocal that also adheres to this pattern yet dominates overall. A fantastic way to start and paves the way for further greatness via the likes of Sleepy LaBeff and His Versatiles and track that should be familiar to many ‘Turn Me Loose’; Ronnie Hawkins and The Hawks’ ‘Clara’, to the celebratory sounding ‘Yes Love’ with compelling vocals supplied by Mel Smith. Billy Boy introduces the harmonica during ‘I Wish You Would’, with the song offering a little something else by deviating from its rhythmic flow by initiating a fadeout halfway through, and then heating up once more before drawing to its conclusion. You will get lost in the hypnotic rhythms of ‘The Diddley Daddy Sound’ and that isn’t a bad place to be judging by the many artists influenced by the music of Bo Diddley.



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