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Later…When The TV Turns To Static

Glasvegas

BMG

After the mixed critical reaction that was ‘Euphoric /// Heartbreak \\\, Glasvegas return with third album ‘Later…When The TV Turns To Static’. There is a real sense of getting back to basics here, as Glasvegas swap the LA landscape of their previous recording for a return to their home roots of Glasgow. With frontman James Allan taking the helm on production duties as well, the outside world is definitely locked out for the moment. Opening song, and title track, ‘Later…When The TV Turns To Static’ appears to reflect the aforementioned difference of opinion regarding Glasvegas’  second effort, as James Allan sounds like a man with his tail between his legs reflecting on what might have been, only to reopen such sores during the fragile ‘Choices’. ‘All I Want Is My Baby’ is in part a stinging response to the financial greed of certain industries (take your pick) and a further realisation that the grass isn’t always greener. It remains, however, the unconventional manner in which James Allan transmits these narratives in his almost slurred Glaswegian burr that sometimes lends itself to spoken word passages – the affecting ‘I’d Rather Be Dead (Than Be With You)’ – that captures the imagination before noting the difficult job the rest of Glasvegas have to contend with in terms of shaping their melodies to fit such awkward yarns. There was never an issue of a comeback album as ‘Later…When The TV Turns To Static’ is merely a continuation of the creative success of their two previous bodies of work. Welcome back Glasvegas.


Released Out now

 

Everything I Let Go And The Things I Refuse To

Old Gray

Dog Knights Productions

Hot on the heels of their deserved critical success for debut album ‘An Autobiography’, Old Gray decide to revisit a former release that sold-out on its first pressing due to heavy demand. ‘Everything I Let Go And The Things I Refuse To’ will see light of day once more through Dog Knights Productions. All four tracks making up this EP provides clear indications of the work that proceeded with the band’s full-length album as there are nods to Explosions In The Sky with delicate guitars ‘359 Pine’ and ‘Resonance’; the latter of which builds to a crescendo and aided by impassioned vocals as Old Gray let out their hearts the only way they know how to. Honest and worthy of your attention.


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Round Our Way

Burning Condors

Snakehand Records

Opening in fine fashion with a buzz saw slide guitar that teeters on the edge during Marcus Thompson’s declaration, “That girl never gets what she wants” sounding equally frustrated for the protagonist’s lustful desires, London four-piece Burning Condors debut full-length album ‘Round Our Way’ continues in a similar vein as songs grapple with issues of boredom and despair associated with modern-day living. ‘Killing Time’ is the perfect execution of such frustrations as opportunities fall through the cracks and one is ‘left out in the cold’ greatly emphasised with a midpoint blues- injected guitar before turning in on itself for one final howl of desperation. Title track, ‘Round Our Way’ continues to pick away at the mundanities of modern living with some gritty guitar work before falling for the girl next door of ‘Polka Dot Girl’ and revealing the band’s penchant for punk rock. Elsewhere, ‘Love On The Rocks’ is absolutely drunk on lust while the raw blues of ‘Honey Trap’ offers a respite from the frantic indie guitar rock and instead allowing the harmonica to power this account of a complex and doomed relationship with the clue being in the opening line. It is left to ‘Twisted Kind Of Bliss’ to really emphasise the Burning Condors collectively impacted frustrations as the collapsing noise of guitars and trailing feedback during its conclusion suggest. There is no better time for Burning Condors to make their mark on an unsuspecting music world because it has been some time since bands of similar ilk have reared their heads and created the kind of wild indie rock blues of ‘Round Our Way’.


Released September 2nd

 

Polka Dot Girl (single)

Burning Condors

Snakehand Records

The opening confession of ‘She’s telling me its Primark’ is the perfect introduction and one that owes a debt of gratitude to the Jarvis Cocker school of lyrical songwriting as The Burning Condors kick-off their latest single ‘Polka Dot Girl’ in some style. Musically, there is more of a connection to the punk sounds of the Sex Pistols, complete with pogoing effect and out of tune backing vocals, as the central protagonist salivates over (possibly) his latest conquest straight from one of London’s more dead-end discos. ‘Polka Dot Girl’ is a dirty slice of primitive rock ‘n’ roll that bodes well for the band’s imminent debut album release this September.


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In These Waters

Mads Langer

Sony

Danish Mads Langer opens up ‘In These Waters’ in broody fashion with hefty electronic beats steadily illuminating ‘Number One’ before lifting the mood with the lyrically playful desires of ‘No Gravity’. Once the indie-pop hooks cast out their lines further – ‘Elephant’, ‘Not Meant To Be Broken’ – the realisation dawns that Mr Langer knows a thing or two about crafting songs with considerable depth yet maintaining a commercial edge. Unfortunately, this is sometimes his undoing as ‘Glass House’ consists of too much gloss and is at odds, for example, with the folk loveliness of title track ‘In These Waters’. Such gripes are minor, however, especially when the penetrating loss of ‘Never Forget You’ with its striking vocal delivery leaves its mark only to be usurped by the closing rawness held in Langer’s throat of standout track ‘Dire Straits’ that renders one utterly speechless.


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Transparency

Ivy League (TX)

Fist In The Air

‘Transparency’ is the debut album from Boston three-piece Ivy League (TX) who deliver a punk rock sound that definitely resides on the perimeters of grunge as songs such as ‘Void’ and ‘Coalesce’ peel back the years to a nineties era. With initial hearings suggesting a band ploughing the same furrow on one too many tracks, persistence will be duly rewarded because this album is a definite grower. The lighter edges of opening song ‘Canopy’ wears its heart on its sleeve and is then duly shattered with the quite brilliant  ‘History Repeats’ stretching itself with, ‘I never want to feel this way again’ only for ‘Losing Sleep’ to reiterate such misgivings . Heartfelt and raw, ‘Transparency’ deserves your attention, just don’t expect immediate gratification.


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Consanguinity

Pariso

Tangled Talk Records

Seemingly falling from nowhere in terms of this second album release due to a non-existent promotional campaign, Pariso return after a year’s absence with ‘Consanguinity’. With Lewis Johns (Gnarwolves, Goodtime Boys, Hexis) on production duties, the songs lining the four walls of this sophomore album lightly purport to family relations and the ties that exist, which is perhaps wise considering use of the Norwegian phrasebook when drumming up a title for ‘Trolljegeren’. It is the manner in which ‘Consanguinity’ really grabs at the senses from the off with its raw intensity but also competing layers of guitar with ‘The Separation’ setting itself up as a perfect example before ‘Maniai’ muscles its way past with its shuffling yet dense rhythm. If there is to be a standout track here, however, then ‘Tower of Genus’ conjures up some magic midway through its brief duration with a surprising turn of events in the vocal department that suggests there is a lot more to come from Pariso.


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The Blessed Unrest

Sara Bareilles

Epic Records

(Very) American indie-pop is the order of the day when it comes to Sara Bareilles third outing ‘The Blessed Unrest’. There are terrific vocals throughout this album and some very intelligent compositions to be had with the hidden depths and leading piano of ‘Hercules’ and the delicate introspection of ‘Manhattan’ with the barest hint of brass instrumentation passing through at various intervals. ‘Satellite Call’ follows in similar fashion but weighs slightly more heavily on the brooding side of things before opening skyward on Bareilles signature vocal. While there may be some cynics deeming ‘The Blessed Unrest’ as mere TV fodder (i.e. the perfect accompaniment to the latest string of US dramas) such notions remain unwise, despite the obvious initial familiarities, because Sara Bareilles has produced a thought-provoking body of work with much to offer if given the time.


Released Out now

 

Long Way Down

Tom Odell

Columbia

With a voice that belies his tender years and not too dissimilar from Jeff Buckley, ‘Long Way Down’ is the debut album from Tom Odell. Having won the critics’ choice prize at this year’s Brits, the award was more than justified considering the quality of the songwriting. There are, however, moments where the songs on display would benefit from a little variation and a little less of the Buckley-isms but considering we’re on the first stepping stone to possible future greatness such quibbles are merely small gripes. The gathering momentum of ‘Grow Old With Me’ sets things up nicely only to be hastily pushed aside by the barroom piano stomp that is ‘Hold Me’ bringing to mind Paul McCartney and Mike Scott of ‘Waterboys fame. There is some niggling tension running through ‘Another Love’ as Odell lets out an expletive that thankfully ushers away any notion of always the victim only to be brought back down to earth with the beautiful yet barely audible ‘Sense’. Despite the sadness, Tom Odell’s world is not about to crumble just yet as there is definite mileage in this singer-songwriter.


Released Out now

 

Dirty Girl Blues (single)

Burning Condors

Snakehand Records

London four-piece Burning Condors evoke memories of a pool of bands who once peddled that scuzzy, sleazy rock ‘n’ roll and blues-inspired sounds from Gallon Drunk to The John Spencer Blues Explosion that sat comfortably with the indie market. ‘Dirty Girl Blues’ is another step in the right direction that tantalises the senses with its sultry buzz saw slide guitar that underpins the tension further with its chiming tones during “That girl never gets what she wants, That girl never gets what she needs”. The flipside ‘What Your Mamma Said’ deserves equal billing as it is a frenetic number laced with lovely backing “wha-oo” vocals before the end result eventually collapses under its own steam. A definite hot prospect.


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Ayahuasca: Welcome To The Work

Ben Lee

Lojinx

How time flies! It certainly does when one considers the great departure in sound from the indie-pop of ‘Breathing Tornados’ and latest album from Ben Lee ‘Ayahuasca: Welcome To The Work’, but it only seems like yesterday – fourteen years, in fact – that ‘Nothing Much Happens’ had such a ring of truth about it. Described as Ben Lee’s most ‘ambitious work to date’ and as a ‘sonic document’ of various experiences with the medicinal plant Ayahuasca, the ten tracks presented here sees the Antiopdean edge closer to John Lennon in spirit due to the desire for experimentation and exploration of untapped levels of consciousness. Nowhere is this more evident than the entering through the portal of ‘Welcome To The House of Mystical Death’ and greeted by a shamanic Tricky before opening up into the light of ‘Meditation On Being Born’. There is beauty to be found here with Appleonia and Ben Lee providing dual vocals to, ‘In The Silence’ stretching out an arm to Lee’s past work, whereas the delicate and skeletal nature of songs ‘The Shadow of The Mind’ and more developed ‘The Will To Grow’ continue the experimental journey. It is satisfying to know that artists such as Ben Lee remain willing to push the creative envelope further by taking risks which to others may seem like commercial suicide. ‘Ayahuasca: Welcome To The Work’ was one risk worth pursuing as it is a fascinating addition to a lengthy catalogue of work.


Released Out now

 

Damage

Jimmy Eat World

Sony

Eight albums in and Jimmy Eat World is still decrying about a broken heart. If it wasn’t for the band’s ability to pen a tune or two, then such sentiments after such a lengthy run would have seen their entire catalogue tested for air travel from the nearest window. As it stands, ‘Damage’ tugs at the heartstrings once more with an irresistible set of songs which, if they had been the equivalent to confectionary would have caused severe tooth decay due to their addictive qualities. Title track, ‘Damage’ is a timely reminder of such abilities with its tale of precaution wrapped in a melodic structure. The pulses might be slowing but such disadvantages merely highlight the band’s experience during the reflective ‘Book of Love’ and ever-present Jimmy Eat World tearjerker ‘Please Say No’. There remains life in the tank, however, with the dynamic ‘I Will Steal You Back’ and ‘How’d You Have Me’ before slipping into a more comfortable pace with ‘Byebyelove’. Not exactly reinventing the wheel, Jimmy Eat World deliver album number eight in considerable style despite one or two familiarities proving a little worn.



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