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Hell Yeah

The Boners

Rhythm Bomb

Once you get past the sniggering behind the bike sheds humour of the band’s moniker and front cover art – the rear image is opted for here due to a variety of reasons – there is much to revel in when it comes to The Boners and their debut album, ‘Hell Yeah’, on Rhythm Bomb Records. Performing a modern take on rockabilly with its heftier sound and touch of the blues for added intensity, The Boners occupy similar territory to the likes of Stray Cats, John Lindberg Trio and Scandinavian rockin’ blues outfit, The Kokomo Kings. Having been a part of the furniture for a number of years, albeit in different guises in relation to the rockin’ scene, the quality of the song writing is watertight throughout ‘Hell Yeah’. This becomes evident once the deviant shenanigans of ‘Muchacha!’ makes itself heard by way of its memorable chorus, that should see this song as a live favourite after a few rounds on the circuit. There’s a deeper level of respect at work during ‘My Baby Don’t Like My Car’, revealing a band unafraid to show a difference of opinion and without too many complaints. The following ‘Lockdown’ thunders along at some pace with harmonica reinforcing the toughness of the guitar, rumbling bass and tight drums, which is not the only source of interest as the lyrics start in compelling fashion, “Well I’m on holiday here in the pen…” and then proceeding to reflect on the obvious frustrations of a restricted environment. Upping the tempo further is the rockabilly on speed of ‘Hotel With No Name’, with the band showing their creative side once more when scribbling a decent yarn. Such inventiveness extends itself to the excellent ‘Walk To The Light’, hinging initially on upright bass and lead vocal, before the rest of the band crash the party which, given the mysterious nature of the narrative, is one they should have avoided. Another potential (live) hit is ‘Driving’; a song full of energy, bass booming and containing a nice touch via backing vocals during its chorus (It’s the little things in life that sometimes make all the difference).  Up and running, The Boners look set for the long haul as ‘Hell Yeah’ is a consistent and confident start full of original material and all the more welcome because of it.


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Insane!

Longboards

El Toro

Continuing its obsession with instrumental albums in relation to the current rockin’ scene, El Toro issues the latest instrumental effort from Longboards. Despite not being a new fixture to this popular genre, due to a few releases prior to their latest release ‘Insane!’, Longboards continue to remain a significant part of this scene, which their current album attests. With the band’s interest in hot rods and dragsters taking centre stage this time out rather than one of their other prime interests of surfing, Longboards set their sound to the grease and grime as well as the high-octane fumes of the dragstrip. Taking full control from the off is the nimble guitar work and crisp drums of ‘Gordini’ that comes with added excitement via occasional samples consisting of hot rods and dragsters tearing up the racetrack. With such opening assurance, ‘Drag Beat’ never lets the side down by taking its corners with precision, neatly represented by way of the guitar’s vibrato arm and then proceeding at a lightning pace where, if you close your eyes, you can almost hear the fingers scaling up and down the fretboard of the guitar, it’s that good! The mood shifts during ‘Insane Dragster’ which is far more menacing in its approach with samples once more adding to the overall atmosphere. In contrast, ‘Molokai (Drunken Hawaiians)’ pacifies the mood with its calmer rhythm dousing the flames of the previous ‘Insane Dragster’. The ‘850 Special’ lives up to its name, due to bursting with energy as both guitars and drums are positioned at the front of the recording mix and giving the impression of vying for centre spot. A talented trio communicating an exciting and detailed set of emotions through their instruments, it’s ‘Insane!’ and it’s by Longboards.


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Cause of You…Two Cats

Rockin' Bonnie & The Mighty Ropers + The Starliters

El Toro

Released separately as two vinyl EPs, Rockin’ Bonnie & The Mighty Ropers + The Starliters is given the double treatment here as both EPs have also been issued as a singular CD album showcasing both releases. By combining both sets of vinyl works seamlessly as the western swing and country bop peppered lightly with elements of rockabilly and honky tonk blends appropriately and giving this an overall sense of one band performing throughout. With The Starliters kicking things off in fine style with their ‘Two Cats’ and followed up with the catchy hook of its chorus and near spoken word delivery of ‘Stuck On This Gal And Spin That Bottle’, it’s hoped that this four-piece band do not leave it another thirteen years before committing their creative ideas to a follow-up EP. The contributions from Rockin’ Bonnie and the Mighty Ropers make this EP a stalemate, if you’re concerned with such things, as the quality of songs is equally impressive. From the lazy, hazy feel of ‘Cause Of You’ given real credence by way of a laidback piano and lap steel guitar setting the mood accordingly. There is a great version of Hank Snow’s ‘Movin’ On’ that’s given a boost via a beefed up guitar, only to be edged out by the western swing influenced ‘I’ve Done Gone Hot Wild’. With this album being a generous offer of two for the price of one, coupled with the fact that both EPs are consistent in their song writing, ‘Cause Of You…Two Cats’ is one record that is going to be difficult to ignore.


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Hit The Floor With..

Brioles

El Toro

Formed in 1986 and hailing from Spain, Brioles is a trio comprising of brothers, Jorge and Daniel Nunes, and odd man out, Josep Maria. Considering the length of time this band has been performing, the comparisons associated with Brioles have been numerous, with the core of their music coming from 50s rock ‘n’ roll, but with definite strands of neo-rockabilly, psychobilly and topped off with a punk rock spirit. Brioles themselves seem to prefer the compromise of Briobilly, which makes itself known once the engine starts running and ‘So Mean’ clatters into life and rattles along at a frantic pace. ‘Yes, No’ provides the first inkling of a taste for punk rock, with its rough and ready approach suggesting a live take as far the recording goes. ‘Boppin’, however, finds Brioles in a reflective stance, with the isolated ‘bop’ of the character at the heart of this song doing his best to stave off the real feelings inside, “I do my best pretending that I don’t love you” with Brioles expertly capturing the mood with a mid-tempo beat. The clue is most definitely in the title regarding ‘Ready To Cha-Cha-Cha’ as it signals it’s ready for anything, especially once its brisk rhythm, partly wrapped around a repetitive guitar pattern, will have you firing on all cylinders in no time. The psychobilly tag looms large above the doorway of ‘Full Moon Spell’, as the song casts a shadow (in a good way!) over proceedings and offers another angle for Brioles to pursue because it’s definitely among the highlights here. With so much zest remaining in their creative tank, Brioles has every reason to stick around and maintain the bop because this is one floor worth hitting on.


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It’s A Scream!!!

Various Artists

El Toro

Arriving just in time before the next venture under the sun and on the sands of Calella, Spain is a compilation of dancefloor fillers personally handpicked from last year’s top DJs spinning the decks at the Screamin’ Festival. With eight DJs selecting three songs apiece, and a remit to provide a reason to shake those limbs, the songs chosen provide a breadth of rockin’ originals. There is no favouritism here as the choice cuts selected from each and every DJ is of the highest order but, unfortunately, there is simply not the time and space to detail each and every entry. The choice of rhythm and blues seems to slightly outweigh the straight rockabilly or rock ‘n’ roll songs and perhaps understandable when the inclusion of the unfortunately named Joseph ‘Mr Google Eyes’ August induces a bout of hip swinging with the rhythm and blues shake of ‘Rough & Rocky Road’, to the “interpret as you will” moniker of Bull Moose Jackson whose forceful rhythm and blues commands the upmost respect. Equally deserving of such recognition is the rhythm and blues rocker ‘If It’s News To You’ courtesy of Little Esther, which is nicely complemented by the compelling vocal delivery of Solomon Burke’s ‘Be Bop Grandma’ that starts off as a velvety tone and ends up almost a full-blown holler by its conclusion. The inclusion of ‘Hoots Mon’ by Lord Rockingham’s XI is a misfire and one that doesn’t rest easy with the rest of this compilation, but several remedies soon arrive in the shape of Ricky Nelson’s excellent rendition of the Baker Knight composition ‘I Wanna Be Loved’; the manic rock of Ralph Nielsen & The Chancellors’ ‘Scream’, and the primitive beats and humorous take of ‘Leopard Man’. ‘It’s A Scream!!! Original Soundtrack of The Screamin’ Festival’ houses enough rockin’ delights to keep your ears engaged and dance shoes moving until the next Screamin’ Festival arrives this year. What a wonderful addition this compilation is, and a great advert for a well-regarded music festival. Viva El Toro!


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Rockabilly Girl

Manny Jr. And The Cyclones

El Toro

Upon first inspection of Manny Jr. And The Cyclones’ ‘Rockabilly Girl’, one item that stood out from the rest was the slightly unconventional vocal, which has a way of sounding a bit off the pace (‘Baby I Don’t Care’) but, after repeat listens, the realisation dawns that what may sound like slight imperfections at first, are actually genuine characteristics that Manny Jr himself brings to these songs. With the jury previously undecided as to the fate of this overall collection, this clever four-piece band from Canada conjure up some rockabilly magic that is brimming with character and bustling with energy. Nowhere is this best served than the opening song ‘Flathead Coupe’ with its overstated deep vocal set to a chuggin’ rhythm supplied by The Cyclones and then, much later, by the late-night ambience created by the slower tempo and naturally raw vocals of ‘Stripper Baby’. This album would not be complete without some wild rockin’, which comes via the album’s title track and other examples such as ‘I Got A Date With You’ and even tougher guitars and vocal of ‘Mean, Mean Baby’. Gene Vincent proves to be something of an inspiration for Manny Jr. And The Cyclones, identified from the band’s artwork and tripping down through songs such as ‘Tougher Than That’ as well as cropping up in various other segments. The musicianship of Manny Jr. And The Cyclones is exemplary throughout, with fine examples coming by way of two instrumentals – the strollin’ ‘Just My Kind of Girl’ and tight rhythm of ‘Mr Eddie’ (listen out for that incredible guitar break folks!). Patience was definitely a virtue when it came to ‘Rockabilly Girl’ because without a second fair hearing, the genius, intelligence and talent of this Canadian rockabilly band would have been a loss of great proportions.


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Wet Side Stories

Jaguar & The Savanas

El Toro

El Toro Records is really turning up the heat with latest release from Jaguar & The Savanas with its occasionally wild, but more often controlled ride of surf-inspired instrumentals. Coming equipped with the self-proclamation of ‘Dedicated to all obscure surf bands like us’, Jaguar & The Savanas is probably under the illusion that their music is restricted to a limited audience, which may have been the case prior to the official launch of ‘Wet Side Stories’, but no doubt the tide has turned in their favour with the eight tracks complied here because there is simply no resistance against the infectious rhythms on offer. By creating a certain amount of mystery regarding the band – the comic book imagery for starters, as well as adopting the title of a popular musical and renaming it with a suggestive and insalubrious substitute – is the stuff rock ‘n’ roll was designed for, and something Jaguar & The Savanas certainly make the most of during their brief stay via ‘Wet Side Stories’. The impact of ‘The Ride of May Gray’ is immediate with its tough and gritty rhythm coming by way of some Dick Dale inspired surf guitar, which happens to follow suit with the equally engrossing ‘Castaway’. There is a measured tempo to ‘After The Ray Storm’, appropriately setting the mood for this song as there appears to be a genuine amount of contemplation occurring before finding its answer via the strolling beat of ‘Gator Rescue’. Such variations in style and pace is the key to Jaguar & The Savanas longevity because as it stands, ‘Wet Side Stories’ is a wonderfully  executed series of instrumentals that fit their billing accurately by maintaining a sense of ambiguity and level of excitement that never outstay their welcome.


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True Love Highway

The Shadowmen

Rhythm Bomb

From the high-altitude city of Albuquerque, New Mexico comes a rockabilly sound by way of The Shadowmen. Composed of sixteen tracks, ‘True Love Highway’ possesses a great deal of talent and one that is not shy when it comes to letting the creative strings fly. Such evidence can be gleaned from the real zip and zest of ‘Revenoor Man’ with its interesting choice of subject matter referring to the prohibition of a certain substance brewed locally. Elsewhere, The Shadowmen turn in genuine slices of 50s rockabilly with such examples as the magnificent ‘Ain’t That A Dilly’ and equally convincing ‘Oh Sally’. There is great guitar work punctuating throughout this album whether spiralling down the scales during the introduction of ‘Sleep Rock – A –Roll Rock – A – Baby’ or dominating the tempo of laidback, ‘True Love Highway’. This, however, is but one component which makes ‘True Love Highway’ the album it is, whereby this five piece manage to make things sound simple when, in fact, there are many subtle layers lurking beneath the surface and where their true craft lies. A clever album and one that will have you glued to its contents from the off, The Shadowmen has provided a suitable ally to accompany the trip along ‘True Love Highway’.


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Goin’ Old School

The Rob Ryan Roadshow

Rhythm Bomb

Fourth album in for Rob Ryan and his Roadshow that shows no signs of letting up, such is the heady mix of rockabilly, rock ‘n’ roll, hillbilly and country sounds which explains the majority of this latest album’s contents, but it should also be noted that there are one or two deviations from this formula. The first indication that other influences are at work here can be heard from the album’s introduction ‘Stay In Bed’, as it snuggles up close to a rhythm and blues sound with Rob Ryan’s vocal sounding light and soulful. The next surprise comes in the form of a cover song, and one that is not selected from the customary vault of 1950’s goodness because this one is taken from a more recent decade with The Eurhythmics ‘Missionary Man’. Despite not being a fan of the original composition, the translation of this Eurythmics hit is a far grittier version, complete with impassioned vocal and side support coming by way of harmonica that manages to receive the unanimous thumbs up. The ‘Goin’ Old School’ of its title really makes itself known with the mid-tempo country ‘Long Gone Day’, then applying its foot on the gas for the rockabilly infused ‘Catwalk Baby’ with Rob Ryan’s vocal impressing throughout. There is time for reflection once ‘When I Found You’ makes its entrance, with its nimble rhythm implying the joy felt as this is one song with a happy ending after years in the doldrums. Further jovialities ensue once the Jerry Lee Lewis inspired wildness of ‘Monkey Beat City’ clambers over the entire contents of this album, letting its presence known via some white-hot rock ‘n’ roll, only to be given a run for its money by way of ‘Not Good Enough’. If only all roadshows were as compelling as the one Rob Ryan is promoting because ‘Goin’ Old School’ is a lesson in how to achieve a finely tuned balance between a choice selection of genres and making it work as a cohesive whole.


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Drinkin Wine

Spo-Dee-O-Dee

Rhythm Bomb

Longstanding German rockabilly band Spo-Dee-O-Dee enter the fray once more with brand new long player ‘Drinkin Wine’. With lead vocalist and guitarist Andy Warner penning eight of the twelve tracks listed, Spo-Dee-O-Dee set about their task admirably with a forceful set of rockabilly numbers. Starting things off is the combined vocals of ‘Little Baby of Mine’ that will have you rockin’ in no time such are the addictive qualities of its main rhythm. Man behind the album’s mastering, Axel Praefke shows his hand at song writing by coming up with ‘Jeannie Come A Running’, which chugs along at a nice pace and is complemented by another Warner effort, ‘I Told A Lie’ that is handled with the upmost care considering its delicate rhythm. The Harlan Howard written, and covered by numerous artists, ‘Sally Was A Good Ole Girl’ is competent in its delivery and likely to remain lodged in the memory bank long after its conclusion due to its catchy lyrics. The vocals are put on hold for the surf inspired instrumental ‘Los Calimuchos’, offering another side to Spo-Dee-O-Dee, before opting for another cover in the form of ‘Messin’ With The Kid’, but this time adding their own personal touches by toning down the adrenalin a notch or two in comparison with the rocket fuelled rendition by Baby Huey & the Baby Sitters.  Great guitar work and an eager vocal really bring to life the emotions felt in ‘Black Slacks Pink Skirt’, which again shows itself during the strolling ‘Let’s Walk Walk Walk’ with Andy Warner injecting much character into the song’s narrative as one can sense the glee in his vocal as he glides down the avenue in question. The taste of wine this four-piece band is brewing is definitely of a sweeter nature as Spo-Dee-O-Dee hold a great passion for their song writing and one that is not afraid to reveal a romantic centre, which this latest album clearly demonstrates.


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Rock & Roll Time

Jerry Lee Lewis

Caroline

The rock ‘n’ roll legend that is Jerry Lee Lewis returns with a new album, ‘Rock & Roll Time’. Having enlisted the creative help of a few well-known musicians including Keith Richards, Nils Lofgren, Neil Young, Robbie Robertson and Shelby Lynne, the songs recorded pay their respects to other legendary artists by covering such songs as Chuck Berry’s ‘Little Queenie’, Johnny Cash with ‘Folsom Prison Blues’ and ‘Stepchild’ by Bob Dylan to name but a small sample. The album was recorded at the House of Blues in Memphis and finds Jerry Lee Lewis in fine form from the off with the barroom melody, and title track, ‘Rock & Roll Time’; a song that was originally co-written and recorded by Kris Kristofferson during the seventies. While there are no embarrassing attempts to re-enact those wild rock ‘n’ roll years, Jerry Lee Lewis belies his years with an energized performance of said Chuck Berry record ‘Little Queenie’, suitably aided by fellow wild rockers Keith Richards and Ron Wood. The following version of Bob Dylan’s ‘Stepchild’ is given a blues workout, expertly handled by Daniel Lanois and Doyle Bramhall II, then swiftly followed by the more rockin’ ‘Sick And Tired’, this time with support coming from Jon Brion. For those eager to hear the latest take on ‘Folsom Prison Blues’ (Johnny Cash) it will not leave you disappointed with its more spacious arrangement allowing itself to pick up an assortment of instruments along the way, which adds a sense of spontaneity to the recording due to sounding as if the various instruments are trying to pull in different directions but somehow managing to combine and provide a genuine alternative cover of this classic song. There is also a country flavour to ‘Rock & Roll Time’, mingling with the rock ‘n’ roll numbers, with the rather dreamy ‘Keep Me In Mind’ and storytelling thread shared by Shelby Lynne during ‘Here Comes That Rainbow Again’. ‘Rock & Roll Time’ is highly commendable for its enthusiasm, inventiveness and warm nature when recreating a number of original compositions that could have easily fallen into the category of going through the motions. As it stands, one of the original rock ‘n’ rollers is not about to call time on his career, and long may that continue.


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Cut Out To Rock

The Backseat Boogie

Rhythm Bomb

It’s time for more Backseat Boogie with their latest release ‘Cut Out To Rock’. Continuing their affiliation with rockabilly and adding much saxophone to the recordings, these rockin’ cats from Italy never take the easy route as latest album ‘Cut Out To Rock’ is jam-packed with much detail and running to a full fourteen tracks! With the title track setting out its intentions from the start, there is clearly one thing on its mind and that is to rock! Following number ‘The Worst And The Best’ reflects two sides of a personality yet retains a clear vision musically with its infectious rhythm containing some sharp guitar and bursts of saxophone that provides this song with a real attitude. ‘Water Out Of Stone’ really stumps up a miracle by transporting the listener back to a bygone era where rhythm and blues and swing dominated for a period, considering the quick footed and relentless pace created by The Backseat Boogie during this particular song. There is a genuine swagger to ‘First To Come (Last To Leave)’ that also reveals The Backseat Boogie’s attention to detail when it comes to the song’s instrumentation. Such is the strength in depth here, that other songs allow for experimentation with ‘Hit The Iron’ letting in the blues with an enthusiastic harmonica firing its engine, and with another twist materialising with the country inspired ‘I Can’t Take It Anymore’ that makes use of the harmonica once more and comes complete with rowdy whistling supplied in the background. Another string to The Backseat Boogie’s bow is their ability to tackle other issues whether speaking out on hardships of city dwelling (‘In The City’), repeating this social commentary via instruments only with ‘Postcard From Zombieville’, or revealing much anxiety about the pains of losing one’s barnet; wonderfully portrayed in a humorous style that searches for answers with an out-of-date bottle of shampoo coming under scrutiny as one possible cause! Nearing the end of ‘Cut Out To Rock’ is quite possibly the standout track under the intriguing heading ‘Long And Silent Drive Back Home’. By utilising drum brushes to exemplify the late-night feel of this pared back song, and containing some fine lyrics to illustrate its heavy heart, ‘Long And Silent Drive Back Home’ is a perfect example of a band at the top of their trade. If you haven’t managed to take a ride with The Backseat Boogie yet, then now is the time to jump on board as this is one band not to be missed!



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